listeningtowords
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The New Shape of Knowledge: From Trees to Piles of Leaves [00:54:00]
@ Oxford University (2005-11-30)
tags: internet taxonomy [add tags]
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From the Oxford Internet Institute: "The digital revolution is enabling knowledge to slip the bonds of the physical which had, silently, shaped it. Now we get to see its "natural" shape. What does it look like? How big are topics when they aren't determined by the economics of paper? Who gets to organize it? What are the new principles we're using to organize it? David Weinberger proposes that in the digital world, the most "natural," efficient and responsive way to manage knowledge is to create huge, distributed piles of leaves, each tagged with as much metadata as possible - including treating the content as metadata - and postponing until the last minute the taxonomizing of the information. What will be the social effects as we move from trees to piles of leaves?"
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After being overwhelmed by the myriad of informational "leaves in a pile," the individual seeker can narrow subject matter to personal interest and leave the rest of the pile of leaves for others. Neat piles of leaves organized into catagories is the way of the future. Micro-managing how the leaves gather under the trees is a natural evolution of knowledge.
posted by melodia at 2007-04-28 06:27:47 EST
The conceptual premise that there will be social effects as we move into the digital world from "trees to leaves' can be seen in the arena of Dungeon and Dragons games. In the the Multi-User Dungeons, (MUDS), instead of one author writing/scripting a story line, many people construct the events of a fictional world. An individual can try on different personalities as they join a story and participate with their profile character. The social enhancement of virtual actors played out by real people give the game player another "side" of his or her self to experience and explore in relative safety.
posted by melodia at 2007-04-30 17:43:47 EST
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